Electrochemically-Modulated Separation Processes for the Treatment of Contaminated Water Sources

Electrochemically-Modulated Separation Processes for the Treatment of Contaminated Water Sources
Alan Hatton, Department of Chemical Engineering

Period of performance: 

September 2015 to August 2017

Abstract: 

We propose to develop and implement a conceptually new strategy for wastewater treatment that relies on electrochemically-modulated separation (EMS) processes. These processes exploit redox-tunable molecular-level affinities of adsorbent materials towards target contaminants and require no additional chemical additives, only a mild source of electrical power. The processes can be operated over a wide range of scales from simple hand-held devices to high-volume treatment facilities without need for high pressure operations.

The design principles for the electrode systems to be established in this work will focus on ensuring the ease and cost of fabrication of the electodes themselves, as well as their assembly into practical devices for use both in individual households, and in more centralized facilities, e.g., for entire villages. Important factors to be considered include: cyclic operational modes, energetics of the process, device fabrication, sources of electrical power, choice of stripping stream solutions, cycling stability, operation at different scales, etc. 

Publications: Su, X., Kulik, H.J., Jamison, T.F., Hatton, T.A. (2016). "Anion-selective redox-electrodes: electrochemically-mediated separation with heterogeneous organometallic interfaces." Advanced Functional Materials. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/adfm.201600079/full  DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201600079